Official US State Birds

Each state in the US has an officially designated state bird. All of the official state birds have been voted in by the local legislature, and represents the spirit of that state. Each one of the 50 States chooses a bird that is local to its state. So, next time you are out on a walk in your state or even visiting a different state, keep an eye out to see if you can find the official state bird! 

Click on the state bird below to find out facts about the state’s official bird. You’ll learn all about the habits, what it looks like, what it eats, and even what song the bird sings!

State Name

Bird Image

Name

Golden-winged Woodpecker
Willow Ptarmigan
Cactus Wren
Mockingbird
California Valley Quail
Lark Bunting
American Robin
Blue Hen Chicken
Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
Nene
Mountain Bluebird
Cardinal
Cardinal
Eastern Goldfinch
Western Meadowlark
Cardinal
Eastern Brown Pelican
Chickadee
Baltimore Oriole
Chickadee
Robin
Common Loon
Mockingbird
Bluebird
Western Meadowlark
Western Meadowlark
Mountain Bluebird
Purple Finch
Eastern Goldfinch
Roadrunner
Eastern Bluebird
Cardinal
Western Meadowlark
Cardinal
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
Western Meadowlark
Ruffed Grouse
Rhode Island Red Hen
Carolina Wren
Ring-necked Pheasant
Mockingbird
Mockingbird
Ring-billed Gull
Hermit Thrush
Cardinal
Eastern Goldfinch
West Virginia
Robin
Western Meadowlark
  Webmaster Notes: The pages shown depicting the official 50 US State birds were drawn from : "Audubon's Birds of America" an 1840 "First Octavo Edition" of John J. Audubon's complete seven volume text. Within the text you will see many names in capital letters. This was the convention that Audubon himself used in his text to set off proper names. We have preserved this convention in our text. Due to the inability of the ASCII character set to print Greek letters, the Greek words that Audubon used in his Family and Genus descriptions have been "Latinized": the letters delta-iota-sigma, for example, have become [dis]; the square brackets indicate that the editors have made this change. A special thank-you goes to Mr. Richard Buonanno, who originally converted the Bird's of America complete text, with references, to HTML format. The 50states.com website utilizes 29 files from Mr. Buonanno's collection